Suggested routes to get the car out

In these times trying men’s souls, get the car out of the garage and take a drive.

The following drives are GPX databases, they can be loaded onto your phone via GPXViewer (Android and iPhone free app) or RunGo – Free on iOS and Android. Gives turn-by-turn voice directions.

These files and instructions are provided for members benefit: your time and mileage may vary. We make no promises that roads have not changed. None of these drives take anyone further than 60 miles from Louisville. At all times, know where you are and be safe

 

This first drive is between 2 and 3 hours and takes you out past 4 Roses. You can jump on 64 at Lawrenceville, or come back on back roads

https://app.box.com/s/o4i6lwlrhf8gvdruh02tv1kcxz71zqt7

This second one goes back roads to Cave C ity, where you can jump on 65 home, or continue back roads West of 65

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This loop takes you out past casino over the lower knobs, taking you across the bridge at Mauckport. Return is through Jefferson Forest.

https://app.box.com/s/y1i9hvrbin4qe0xazns6r8fr14yt5zsc

The last takes you around the knobs ending in Georgetown by an ice crem shop, which may be open.

https://app.box.com/s/08hxkdgybwnzgffjz76b8babpqfrqgxu

 

 

Important information regarding club events

In light of the current environment we are all facing regarding the spread of the coronavirus, we are announcing that the board will be monitoring over time and making decisions based upon conditions as we get closer to each event. It is our intent to provide reasonable notice should an event need to be cancelled. Participation in club events are entirely voluntary and you do so based upon your own circumstances. Everyone is advised to use their own discretion whether or not to participate.

Any updates to other upcoming events will be posted to TeamApp.

KYPCA 2020 Bylaws Amended

KYPCA Bylaws were amended and approved at the monthly membership meeting Monday, February 10, 2020. The amended bylaws are now posted.

October 2019 Activities Report

“Do not go gentle into that good night”. In Kentucky, we interpret that to mean, as the summer driving season comes to a close, we need to rage against the dying of the light. And not going gentle is what we do. First up was a LuxRow Distillery tour in Bardstown, KY. As Bardstown is 65 miles away (based on the roads we take), it gives ample opportunity to explore secondary roads twisting around hills and streams.

Two weeks later, it was a drive out Huber’s Farm to meet up with three other Porsche regions: Central and Southern Indiana and Bluegrass. Huber’s is a local farm experience: pick ya own pumpkins, wine tasting, turkey dines and rows upon rows of Porsches.

We followed that up with our 5th annual Germanfest/Bourbonfest hosted by Steve and Bernadette Doolin at their place out in the woods outside of Louisville. Next up was two more bourbon tours on two separate weekends. Wild Turkey, one of the oldest distilleries in Kentucky, followed by Castle & Key, two weeks later, one of the newest.

Castle & Key Distillery is located on the site of the historic Old Taylor Distillery, outside Frankfort. After sitting abandoned to fall into ruin, new owners purchased the property in 2014. Production began at the distillery in late 2016 for the first time in over 40 years. Besides incredible architecture, the site also has 110 acres of gardens and river views in one of the prettiest locations in Kentucky.

We finished off the season with the Kentucky Covered Bridge Tour. Covered bridges are a staple of the Midwest, the wood covering preserving the bridges from the ravages of sun and rain.

Kentucky Invades Ohio!

Before we escalate to acts of armed aggression, I should clarify: the PCA region of Kentucky spent the weekend driving through the Hocking Hills portion of southeast Ohio. The Hocking Hills is a deeply dissected area of the Allegheny Plateau featuring cliffs, gorges, rock shelters, and waterfalls. The area’s topography is due to particular sandstone formation: thick, hard and weather-resistant, forming high cliffs and narrow, deep gorges.

The area is world famous for its roads featuring sweeping curves and scenery. What would you expect from roads named “Black Diamond Run”, “Zaleski Zipper” or “Hocking Hills Nipper”? A favored spot for America’s motor journalists, frequently using the area for sports car comparisons. In fact, Car & Driver magazine has declared a 14-mile path they’ve carved out in the Hills as their “favorite test loop” for taking a vehicle through the motions. The magazine has been testing cars on the roads here since at least 1989. Well, if it’s good enough for Car & Driver, it must be good enough for KYPCA.

Lest you think it was all roads meant to be explored in a spirited fashion, the area also features more bucolic routes: “Lazy Rivers” and “Rim of the World”. Not least but last, there is the famed “Triple Nickle”: up and down and around a route guaranteed to make your passenger sick.

We decided to make a weekend out of the trip, leaving Louisville early Saturday to return Sunday night. Of our 700 mile round trip, 300 miles were spent on the Hills’ “Windy 9” (as in “winding”, not as in blowing air); 9 specific routes featuring the best scenic and winding routes for cars and motorcycles. A brief aside: does everyone in Ohio always drive 20 miles under the speed limit at all times? Our admittedly less than statistically accurate survey would say “YES”!

Besides sampling routes, we spent time visiting many popular tourist attractions, including the pencil sharpener museum, featuring a collection of over 3,400 pencil sharpeners (including one shaped like a 911 Turbo), thought to be the nation’s largest.

Our monthly activities also included our annual trip to Southern Indiana’s Polly’s Freeze, serving ice cream continuously since 1952.

 

June 30 Drive to Hocking Hills, Ohio

Most of us probably read Car & Driver and Road & Track magazines each month. Over the course of many Porsche, Jaguar, Maserati, etc road tests, there are continuous references to the Hocking Hills and Southeastern Ohio’s magnificent roads. Well, maybe it’s time we checked this out: if it’s good enough for motor sports journalists, it’s got to be good enough for us.

And so, June 29th to 30th, we drive to Athens for the Windy 9 (as in winding roads, not blowing air).

Want more info on why? Check out: https://www.explorehockinghills.com/blog/posts/2016/may/experience-the-thrill-of-driving-hocking-hills-famously-scenic-roads/

We’ll leave 9 am Saturday freewaying to Cincinnati, from where we’ll take 2 lane roads arriving in the Hocking Hills by 12 or so. We’ll spend the next 4 to 5 hours sampling roads following a pre-planned route, stopping in Athens for the night. Sunday, we’ll drive more of the hills until around 1 PM or so, before heading back to Louisville via Maysville and Paris. Some of our stops may include the one remaining, still in operation, washboard factory.

Please RSVP so we can get a head count and try to arrange a group rate at a motel. Food, lodging all responsibility of attendees.

May 2019 Activity Report

The Kentucky Region covers a territory 200 miles wide by 120 miles North to South. Of our 480 members, 410 reside in the greater Louisville area, at the North East corner of the region. 20 members are in the south and 50 in the West (and 1 in Belgium).

This month, we decided to follow Horace Greeley’s advice and go West to join up with our far western neighbors. We first traveled Kentucky parkways for 90 miles prior to smaller two lane roads. Our first destination Jefferson Davis State Park, home of the world’s tallest concrete non-reinforced obelisk. Washington’s Monument stands 554 feet tall: Jeff Davis Memorial stands 351. Kentucky was a southern state during the Civil War.

Don’t know any of us would claim confederate sympathies, just wanted to see a 35 story concrete obelisk standing in the middle of a farm field.

Our next stop was the Casey Jones distillery, where we met some of our western members, located outside of Hopkinsville, KY. The distillery was named neither for the famed engineer, nor the Grateful Dead song, but for an early moonshiner from the woods of far Western KY, whose grandson operates it today using the original still design. His shine was the only liquor acceptable to Al Capone, himself a native of the same area.

After touring the modest, but attractive distillery, we all repaired to a local BBQ for lunch (and home made coconut cream pie) prior to the long drive home.

Would that have been all, it would have been enough, except the region also attended the annual Joe and Jane Galownia Steak and Wine party, a pre-purchase inspections tech session from Mitch at Stuttgart Specialists and KYPCA Ladies Night at the local Massage Envy hosted by the lovely Vycki Minstein.

 

April 2019 Drive to Overlook Restaurant

The Overlook restaurant is uniquely positioned on a bluff in Leavenworth, Indiana, offering a 20 mile panoramic vista of the Ohio River.  As you enjoy your meal, watch barges churning up and down the river or the sun setting behind the wooded hills of Indiana.

The restaurant serves up country classics such as fried chicken, pork chops, chicken pot pie, and catfish fillets—and in-house baked coconut cream pie worth an hour’s drive.

Or maybe, it was the donuts. April’s first drive started at a late enough hour to get folk out of bed (10:30 leave time) and at what is arguably Louisville’s best for donuts: North Lime Donuts. Regardless, we had a 50 mile drive through the farm country of deep south Indiana, between the twin urban Indiana metropolises of Elizabeth (pop204) and Laconia (pop 51). Once through Corydon, our group of 27 cars and 38 folk remained on Hwy 62 along the Ohio River bottoms until reaching Leavenworth and the Overlook restaurant.

Following PCA recommended protocol, we had split the 27 cars into three separate drive groups. Leaving 5 minutes apart and staying within speed limits allowed us to be safe, and not disrupt local traffic by trains 10,15 or more cars long. As a result, we arrived at the Overlook parking area with enough time between to safely park.

The Overlook had reserved 3 long and two 6 top tables in a separate room, surrounded by views of the curve of the Ohio. Everyone enjoyed a country style home cooked lunch and some of wisely chose dessert (the wisest among us choosing coconut cream pie, just sayin’).

After lunch, it was time to saddle up for the drive home. Some chose to go direct to the freeway, a little West and North. Some chose back to drive East back to Corydon following State Scenic Route Hwy 62 getting on the freeway after the scenic part of the drive. And some decided the day was warm enough to drive further North and West to Patoka Lake sampling a wine called “Drunken Bunny Piss”. We hope they make a safe return.

 

2019 Endurance Donut Run

An old proverb states: “March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb”. Well, here in Kentucky, it’s more comes in like a lion and hangs around like a feral boar. Scheduling drives means potentially contending with rain, sleet, ice, cold, sunshine, and that’s all in one day.

This past Saturday, a group of stalwarts braved the 30 degree temperatures to meet at the rest area on I64 at 8:30 because, well…getting the car out is important, but even more: visiting not 1, but 2 separate donut shops is well-nigh life saving. In the words the great philosopher, Homer Simpson: “Uhm…donuts”…indeed.

We left the interstate in Shelbyville venturing out on some of Kentucky’s fine back roads, around, alongside and over the Kentucky river and its many tributaries. For those geology buffs among us, the open limestone cliffs were a stark reminder of the tremendous waterflow through here from the melting of the great ice sheets of the last ice age. How much water?

Well, water density at room temperature is 0.998g/cm³; the density of ice is 0.9167 g/cm³.  The ratio of volumes is inversely proportional to the ratio of densities.  So, for example, one gallon of water near the freezing point would make the equivalent of 1.090 gallons of ice. When an ice sheet two miles thick melts it produces a lot of water. Enough to carve out hills, valleys and carry off sediment, displaying (and eroding) the hard rock underneath.

Whatever: we had a lot of pretty scenery to drive through as we got to our first stop: B’s Bakery in downtown Frankfort. Their constantly shifting selection of fresh donuts made decisions hard and a number of us grabbed some to go. The heath bar donut especially interested me, but too much sugar can be, well, too much.

After B’s, we saddled up and went out through the flat farm lands of central Kentucky, again driving along the Kentucky river and more of it’s tributaries, but this time, in the flatter zone indicative of the Kentucky Bluegrass. We ended up driving through the thoroughbred horse farms producing Derby competition to arrive at our 2nd stop: Doughdaddy’s Donuts outside Versailles. Although a donut specialty house, the clear winner was Bs with their varied home made specialties.

We finished off the drive with lunch at the Versailles Tap Room (enough safe parking for the Porsches) before striking out back home. Great drive, though some of those one lane wide roads were a bit off-putting to all concerned.

 

March 2019 Drive to Story Inn in Story, Indiana

“It was a dark and stormy night…”, well actually, it was cloudy (thought it did get stormy later) and it was morning…like early morning. But! We met at a donut shop and had excellent donuts from North Lime Donuts (their original store in Lexington was on our 1st Annual Donut Run last year, but cut for being too far away). 6 cars and 7 folk altogether made the 200 mile round trip to Story Inn, in Story, IN, inside Brown County.

Along the way, we decided to explore some of the farm country between Salem, IN and I-65. We visited two separate covered bridges along the way, including one outside Medora, the longest single span covered bridge and this one in Leota, what must be the worlds shortest.

 

 

Although rain had threatened and was in the air, we were able to get to the Story Inn on time for our noon reservation. We looked at the numerous antique bottles and other glassware, the kitchen meat grinder (I remember my mother using one in the 1960s) and other antiques in the main dining room.

The village of Story itself was founded in 1851, with the grant of a land patent from President Millard Fillmore to Dr. George Story. Dr. Story and his progeny built many of the structures which distinguish this town today, from the then-ample supply of domestic hardwoods. Story soon became the largest settlement in the area. In its heyday (1880-1929) the village supported two general stores, a nondenominational church, a one-room schoolhouse, a grain mill, a sawmill, a slaughterhouse, a blacksmith’s forge and a post office.

Story never recovered from the Great Depression (1929-1933), as families abandoned farms in search of work elsewhere. Brown County lost half of its population between 1930 and 1940. The exodus created the opportunity for the State of Indiana to purchase 16,000 for what is now Brown County State Park.

By the time we had finished lunch, the rain had started. Some opted to head south and hop on I 65 in Brownstown; others, chose the highway through Salem, passing through some occasionally intense cloud bursts, but mostly, just more rain.