June 2019 Membership Report

Primary Members 308
Affiliate Members 176
Total Members 484
7 New members joined in May

 

 

 

 

June 30 Drive to Hocking Hills, Ohio

Most of us probably read Car & Driver and Road & Track magazines each month. Over the course of many Porsche, Jaguar, Maserati, etc road tests, there are continuous references to the Hocking Hills and Southeastern Ohio’s magnificent roads. Well, maybe it’s time we checked this out: if it’s good enough for motor sports journalists, it’s got to be good enough for us.

And so, June 29th to 30th, we drive to Athens for the Windy 9 (as in winding roads, not blowing air).

Want more info on why? Check out: https://www.explorehockinghills.com/blog/posts/2016/may/experience-the-thrill-of-driving-hocking-hills-famously-scenic-roads/

We’ll leave 9 am Saturday freewaying to Cincinnati, from where we’ll take 2 lane roads arriving in the Hocking Hills by 12 or so. We’ll spend the next 4 to 5 hours sampling roads following a pre-planned route, stopping in Athens for the night. Sunday, we’ll drive more of the hills until around 1 PM or so, before heading back to Louisville via Maysville and Paris. Some of our stops may include the one remaining, still in operation, washboard factory.

Please RSVP so we can get a head count and try to arrange a group rate at a motel. Food, lodging all responsibility of attendees.

May 2019 Activity Report

The Kentucky Region covers a territory 200 miles wide by 120 miles North to South. Of our 480 members, 410 reside in the greater Louisville area, at the North East corner of the region. 20 members are in the south and 50 in the West (and 1 in Belgium).

This month, we decided to follow Horace Greeley’s advice and go West to join up with our far western neighbors. We first traveled Kentucky parkways for 90 miles prior to smaller two lane roads. Our first destination Jefferson Davis State Park, home of the world’s tallest concrete non-reinforced obelisk. Washington’s Monument stands 554 feet tall: Jeff Davis Memorial stands 351. Kentucky was a southern state during the Civil War.

Don’t know any of us would claim confederate sympathies, just wanted to see a 35 story concrete obelisk standing in the middle of a farm field.

Our next stop was the Casey Jones distillery, where we met some of our western members, located outside of Hopkinsville, KY. The distillery was named neither for the famed engineer, nor the Grateful Dead song, but for an early moonshiner from the woods of far Western KY, whose grandson operates it today using the original still design. His shine was the only liquor acceptable to Al Capone, himself a native of the same area.

After touring the modest, but attractive distillery, we all repaired to a local BBQ for lunch (and home made coconut cream pie) prior to the long drive home.

Would that have been all, it would have been enough, except the region also attended the annual Joe and Jane Galownia Steak and Wine party, a pre-purchase inspections tech session from Mitch at Stuttgart Specialists and KYPCA Ladies Night at the local Massage Envy hosted by the lovely Vycki Minstein.

 

May 2019 Membership Report

Kentucky Region

Primary Members 307
Affiliate Members 176
Total Members 483

Test Drive Participants: 5

 

PCA National Club

Primary Members 84804

Affiliate Members 46616

Life Members  17

2019 KYPCA Activities

2019 KYPCA Activity List

March 9th – Drive to Story, Indiana (Brown County State Park)

March 16th – Tech Session at Blue Grass Dealership

March 23rd – Donut Run

April 6th – Drive to the Overlook Restaurant in Leavenworth, IN

April 20th – Drive to the Chicken House in Sellersburg, IN

May 11th – Joe and Jane Galownia’s Steak & Wine Dinner, New Albany, IN

May 18th – Tech Session at Stuttgart Specialists

May 19th – KYPCA Ladies Night Out – Massage Envy hosted by Vycki Minstein

May 25th – Casey Jones Distillery Tour, Hopkinsville, KY

June 8-9 – Summer Driver’s Education, Putnam Road Course, Greencastle, IN

June 29 – Overnight trip to Athens, OH

July 12th – Polly’s Freeze Ice Cream Run, Georgetown, IN

July 20th – Keeneland Concours

August 3rd – Urban Bourbon Distillery Tours – Old Forester & Michter’s, Louisville

August 9, 10 & 11 – Tail of the Dragon Tour

August 24th – Pool Party hosted by Anthony and Vycki Minstein, Louisville

August 30th – Little Twirl Ice Cream Run, Salem, IN

September 7-8- Fall Driver’s Education, Putnam Road Course, Greencastle, IN

September 21st – LuxRow Distillery Tour, Bardstown, KY

October 5th – Huber’s Drive, Starlight, IN

October 5th – Germanfest/Bourbonfest hosted by Steve and Bernadette Doolin

October 12th – Wild Turkey Distillery Tour, Lawerenceburg, KY

November 2nd – Castle and Key Distillery Tour, Frankfort, KY

November 16th – Kentucky Covered Bridge Tour

Additional details for each event will be distributed as their respective dates approach.

April 2019 Drive to Overlook Restaurant

The Overlook restaurant is uniquely positioned on a bluff in Leavenworth, Indiana, offering a 20 mile panoramic vista of the Ohio River.  As you enjoy your meal, watch barges churning up and down the river or the sun setting behind the wooded hills of Indiana.

The restaurant serves up country classics such as fried chicken, pork chops, chicken pot pie, and catfish fillets—and in-house baked coconut cream pie worth an hour’s drive.

Or maybe, it was the donuts. April’s first drive started at a late enough hour to get folk out of bed (10:30 leave time) and at what is arguably Louisville’s best for donuts: North Lime Donuts. Regardless, we had a 50 mile drive through the farm country of deep south Indiana, between the twin urban Indiana metropolises of Elizabeth (pop204) and Laconia (pop 51). Once through Corydon, our group of 27 cars and 38 folk remained on Hwy 62 along the Ohio River bottoms until reaching Leavenworth and the Overlook restaurant.

Following PCA recommended protocol, we had split the 27 cars into three separate drive groups. Leaving 5 minutes apart and staying within speed limits allowed us to be safe, and not disrupt local traffic by trains 10,15 or more cars long. As a result, we arrived at the Overlook parking area with enough time between to safely park.

The Overlook had reserved 3 long and two 6 top tables in a separate room, surrounded by views of the curve of the Ohio. Everyone enjoyed a country style home cooked lunch and some of wisely chose dessert (the wisest among us choosing coconut cream pie, just sayin’).

After lunch, it was time to saddle up for the drive home. Some chose to go direct to the freeway, a little West and North. Some chose back to drive East back to Corydon following State Scenic Route Hwy 62 getting on the freeway after the scenic part of the drive. And some decided the day was warm enough to drive further North and West to Patoka Lake sampling a wine called “Drunken Bunny Piss”. We hope they make a safe return.

 

April 2019 Membership Report

“It was a dark and stormy night…”, well actually, cloudy (thought it did get stormy later) and  morning. But, an opportunity to consume excellent donuts at our meet up spot preparing to brave the elements for the 200 mile round trip to Story, IN, inside Brown County. We explored the farm country and roads over and on top of glacial moraines visiting two separate covered bridges.

Although rain had threatened, we were able to get to the Story Inn on time for brunch, surrounded by antique bottles, glassware and a meat grinder (I remember my mother using one in the 1960s).

Story was founded in 1851, a land patent grant from President Millard Fillmore to Dr. George Story. Story soon became the largest settlement in the area, in 1880-1929 supporting two general stores, a nondenominational church, a schoolhouse, grain mill, sawmill, slaughterhouse, blacksmith’s forge and post office. Story never recovered from the Great Depression creating the opportunity for the State of Indiana to purchase 16,000 for what is now Brown County State Park.

“March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb”. Well, here in Kentucky, we add “…and hangs around like a feral boar”. Scheduling drives means potentially contending with rain, sleet, ice, cold and warm sunshine: all in one day.

With weather remaining so uncooperative, our next adventure was a tech session at Bluegrass Motor Sports. The how’s of replacing plugs on coils. Well attended, we were walked through the procedures and dos and don’ts…afterwards, consuming large quantities of pizza.

Our last activity for the month the 2nd Annual Endurance Donut Run, visiting separate donut shops around central Kentucky. As Homer Simpson says: “Uhm…donuts”…indeed.

We ventured out on some of Kentucky’s fine back roads, around, alongside and over the Kentucky river and its many tributaries. For those geology buffs among us, the open limestone cliffs were a stark reminder of the tremendous waterflow through here from the melting of the great ice sheets of the last ice age. How much water? Considering water density at room temperature is 0.998g/cm³ and ice is 0.9167 g/cm³,  the ratio of volumes is inversely proportional to the ratio of densities.  So an ice sheet two miles thick melting produces a lot of water: enough to carve out hills, valleys and erode the hard rock underneath.

Whatever: we had a lot of pretty scenery to drive through as we got to our first stop: B’s Bakery in downtown Frankfort. Their constantly shifting selection of fresh donuts made decisions difficult and a number of us grabbed some to go. The heath bar donut especially interested me, but too much sugar can be, well, too much.

After B’s, we saddled up and went out through the flat farm lands of central Kentucky, again driving along the Kentucky river and more of it’s tributaries, but this time, in the flatter zone indicative of the Kentucky Bluegrass. We ended up driving through the thoroughbred horse farms producing Derby competition to arrive at our 2nd stop: Doughdaddy’s Donuts outside Versailles. Although a donut specialty house, the clear winner was Bs with their varied home made specialties.

By the time we had finished lunch, it was warm enough to put down the top (albeit with seat and steering wheel heaters in ON position) as we drove home.

Primary Members: 305

Co Members: 177

Total Members: 482

March 2019 President’s Report

Hey everyone sorry for being late and missing last month’s president notes. I have been busy with being a part of the Werks Reunion and Festival of Speed in Amelia Island Florida. And soooo had the Club, with planning this year’s events. T.H. Morris and Edward Hessel our activity chairs have planned a fun and exciting event schedule. Check it out on our web sight www.kypca.org and on Facebook. We have completed three events already and Spring is only a week old. Wow, pick the event you would like to attend and put it on your calendar and plan on being there. And don’t forget to plan on attending one or both of our DE events. Even if you don’t want to drive in the event. Just come up to Putnam Raceway Park and join in the fun.

I just got back from the PCA Zone 13 presidents meeting in Chicago. The National Club is doing well. With 83,482 primary members (a 4.8 % growth) 45,877 co-members (3.15% growth) with a total of 129,359 members nationwide which includes Canada. Another interesting statistic compiled by PCA National is the number of Porsche vehicles in The Kentucky Region area vs the number of KYPCA members at the end of 2018. Number of total Kentucky vehicles registered is 2,085 and the number of PCA members cars are 310. Primary membership market share is only 15%. Which mean we have major room for growth. That also compares the number of sports cars at 27% with the number of 4-Door Porsches at 38%. Looks like we truly need to get our 4-Door friends involved some how some way. Any suggestion??

The National web sight is being updated to be more user friendly. And I suggest that all members establish a log-in account on the National web page. There’s a ton of information there for the asking. One new item which has been implemented is SIM Racing supported by I Racing, started on March 23rd. Each race will be streamed live on every Friday afternoon check the web page for details.

National will also be making available 4:1 for all SUV owners/Panamera 4-door cars a monthly e-newsletter. It is available to sign up for this service at pca.org.

Thanks for reading my report. The April meeting will be at Joe’s Older that Dirt in Lyndon. Come for the social gathering at 6:30, meeting starts at 7.

Please drink responsibly.

Steve McCombs, 2019 KYPCA president

2019 Endurance Donut Run

An old proverb states: “March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb”. Well, here in Kentucky, it’s more comes in like a lion and hangs around like a feral boar. Scheduling drives means potentially contending with rain, sleet, ice, cold, sunshine, and that’s all in one day.

This past Saturday, a group of stalwarts braved the 30 degree temperatures to meet at the rest area on I64 at 8:30 because, well…getting the car out is important, but even more: visiting not 1, but 2 separate donut shops is well-nigh life saving. In the words the great philosopher, Homer Simpson: “Uhm…donuts”…indeed.

We left the interstate in Shelbyville venturing out on some of Kentucky’s fine back roads, around, alongside and over the Kentucky river and its many tributaries. For those geology buffs among us, the open limestone cliffs were a stark reminder of the tremendous waterflow through here from the melting of the great ice sheets of the last ice age. How much water?

Well, water density at room temperature is 0.998g/cm³; the density of ice is 0.9167 g/cm³.  The ratio of volumes is inversely proportional to the ratio of densities.  So, for example, one gallon of water near the freezing point would make the equivalent of 1.090 gallons of ice. When an ice sheet two miles thick melts it produces a lot of water. Enough to carve out hills, valleys and carry off sediment, displaying (and eroding) the hard rock underneath.

Whatever: we had a lot of pretty scenery to drive through as we got to our first stop: B’s Bakery in downtown Frankfort. Their constantly shifting selection of fresh donuts made decisions hard and a number of us grabbed some to go. The heath bar donut especially interested me, but too much sugar can be, well, too much.

After B’s, we saddled up and went out through the flat farm lands of central Kentucky, again driving along the Kentucky river and more of it’s tributaries, but this time, in the flatter zone indicative of the Kentucky Bluegrass. We ended up driving through the thoroughbred horse farms producing Derby competition to arrive at our 2nd stop: Doughdaddy’s Donuts outside Versailles. Although a donut specialty house, the clear winner was Bs with their varied home made specialties.

We finished off the drive with lunch at the Versailles Tap Room (enough safe parking for the Porsches) before striking out back home. Great drive, though some of those one lane wide roads were a bit off-putting to all concerned.

 

March 2019 Drive to Story Inn in Story, Indiana

“It was a dark and stormy night…”, well actually, it was cloudy (thought it did get stormy later) and it was morning…like early morning. But! We met at a donut shop and had excellent donuts from North Lime Donuts (their original store in Lexington was on our 1st Annual Donut Run last year, but cut for being too far away). 6 cars and 7 folk altogether made the 200 mile round trip to Story Inn, in Story, IN, inside Brown County.

Along the way, we decided to explore some of the farm country between Salem, IN and I-65. We visited two separate covered bridges along the way, including one outside Medora, the longest single span covered bridge and this one in Leota, what must be the worlds shortest.

 

 

Although rain had threatened and was in the air, we were able to get to the Story Inn on time for our noon reservation. We looked at the numerous antique bottles and other glassware, the kitchen meat grinder (I remember my mother using one in the 1960s) and other antiques in the main dining room.

The village of Story itself was founded in 1851, with the grant of a land patent from President Millard Fillmore to Dr. George Story. Dr. Story and his progeny built many of the structures which distinguish this town today, from the then-ample supply of domestic hardwoods. Story soon became the largest settlement in the area. In its heyday (1880-1929) the village supported two general stores, a nondenominational church, a one-room schoolhouse, a grain mill, a sawmill, a slaughterhouse, a blacksmith’s forge and a post office.

Story never recovered from the Great Depression (1929-1933), as families abandoned farms in search of work elsewhere. Brown County lost half of its population between 1930 and 1940. The exodus created the opportunity for the State of Indiana to purchase 16,000 for what is now Brown County State Park.

By the time we had finished lunch, the rain had started. Some opted to head south and hop on I 65 in Brownstown; others, chose the highway through Salem, passing through some occasionally intense cloud bursts, but mostly, just more rain.